Vancouver travel guide

Vancouver Tourism | Vancouver Guide

You're Going to Love Vancouver

Everyone who visits Vancouver seems to fall in love with this northwestern Canadian city. Why? Because Vancouver is down to earth, diverse, relaxed, and beautiful.

Some people love the food culture of the city, and it’s easy to see why. Dine on superb sushi at authentic Japanese restaurants like Miku or Toshi Sushi, sample local brews at the Craft Beer Market (85 West 1st Avenue) or shop for fresh produce on Granville Island.

For others, the great outdoors is the main attraction. During the summer, beaches like Jericho and Kitsilano are safe, family-friendly places to enjoy the sunshine. Vancouver Island offers kayaking, hiking, and climbing, and cycle paths across town make pedal-power a great way to get around.

There are festivals, shops, galleries – everything a world-class city should have. But above all else, Vancouver is welcoming. Wherever you come from, the city will offer you something to taste, see, or do.

Top 5 Reasons to Visit Vancouver

Scenery and Nature

British Columbia is one of the most beautiful places on earth. The snowy slopes of the Rockies and the dramatic valleys around Vancouver are fantastic places for budding nature photographers to show off their skills, but the coastal scenery around Vancouver harbor is as stunning. Head to the Capilano Suspension Bridge for a family-friendly spot with great views that is close to the center of town.

World Cuisine

Above all else, Vancouver residents have a passion for eating out. With a diverse population featuring large communities from China, Japan, Korea, South-East Asia, Europe, and India, gourmet food lovers will surely find something to love. Check out the sushi at Miku (200 Granville St), the Thai dishes at Sawasdee (4250 Main St), and the Korean selection at Royal Seoul (1215 W Broadway) to see why foodies rate Vancouver so highly.

Art and Culture

If you love art, Vancouver won’t disappoint. The Vancouver Art Gallery is the place to start, with its collection of works by Canadian artists, but serious art lovers should head to smaller galleries as well. Centre A (229 East Georgia St) showcases Asian-Canadian work, and the Catriona Jeffries Gallery (274 East 1st Avenue) has a constantly changing array of works by leading contemporary artists.

Sports

Sports are a major part of life in Vancouver. It’s definitely a city where hockey is king, and watching a Canucks match at the Rogers Arena (800 Griffiths Way) is a thrilling experience. If hockey isn’t your passion, you can also watch the BC Lions in the CFL or the Vancouver Whitecaps, one of the leading Major League Soccer franchises.

Music Events

Vancouver has always had a thriving alternative music scene, much like Seattle not far to the south. Venues across the city are taken over in June and July by the Vancouver International Jazz Festival, there’s the Folk Festival at Jericho Beach Park in July, while Rock the Shores features major rock artists.

What to do in Vancouver

1. Stanley Park: Where Joggers, Beach-Goers and Yogis Unite

It may sound like your average, run-of-the-mill park in the city, but Stanley Park is quite like Central Park: a world unto itself. Park-goers can get lost in the half a million trees, standing as tall today as in the 1800s. Its diverse landscape makes Stanley Park a natural haven evolving of itself, rather than a planned park. Take advantage of dense forest trails, the surrounding waters of Vancouver Harbor and English Bay, the pedestrian park along the Vancouver Seawall and a cute miniature railway that winds through the park. Then, make your way to the peaceful Lost Lagoon, where Great Blue Herons and swans make their homes.

2. Granville Island: Festivals and Farmers' Markets Galore!

Summertime means island time in Vancouver! Spend just a day or return over and over -- Granville Island will charm you with its quaint farmers' markets and extensive marina that's perfect for people watching on a sunny day. The Island has plenty of boutique shops and artist stalls to occupy curious visitors and it's also home to the Granville Island brewing Co. Set up a tour of the brewery and partake in one of the many outdoor events like the Vancouver Fringe Festival and even a concert or two.

3. Museum of Anthropology: Learn More at MoA

Situated within the grounds of the University of British Columbia, the Museum of Anthropology attracts more than just students. It is home to a diverse and global display of arts and culture, tracking the evolution of civilizations through their physical artefacts and cultural practices. MOA pays special attention to capturing Canada's Pacific Northwest and its history of indigenous and First Nations peoples. Expect interactive exhibits, graffiti workshops and oral history demonstrations.

4. Kitsilano Beach: Bring a Beach "Kit" for a Day in the Sun

Clean-sand beaches and the sparkling views of the English Bay are what await beach-goers at Kits beach. Young, old and everyone in between converge here for a day of beach fun. Its popularity is not only because the beach is so immediately accessible by urban-dwellers and visitors alike -- it's also because the beach has the longest swimming pool in Canada, an outdoor saltwater pool (that's also heated!), a playground and several beach volleyball courts. When you're done working up a tan and tossing the Frisbee around, head to the vibrant Boathouse restaurant for some fantastically fresh seafood.

5. Grouse Mountain: Grinding Trails and Stunning Views

The Grouse Grind Trail is what locals know Grouse Mountain best for. Visitors, however, will enjoy at first embarking on the Skyride to the peak of Grouse Mountain. Covered in the winters by a neat cap of snow and in the summers by dense firs and greenery, the mountain is home to grizzly bear habitats and more. Enjoy activities like guided eco-tours, a cinematic viewing of Grouse Mountain's wildlife and tandem paragliding. Then, head to the Skydeck for stunning mountain views and the Altitudes Bistro to chow down after an adventurous day.

1. Stanley Park: Where Joggers, Beach-Goers and Yogis Unite

It may sound like your average, run-of-the-mill park in the city, but Stanley Park is quite like Central Park: a world unto itself. Park-goers can get lost in the half a million trees, standing as tall today as in the 1800s. Its diverse landscape makes Stanley Park a natural haven evolving of itself, rather than a planned park. Take advantage of dense forest trails, the surrounding waters of Vancouver Harbor and English Bay, the pedestrian park along the Vancouver Seawall and a cute miniature railway that winds through the park. Then, make your way to the peaceful Lost Lagoon, where Great Blue Herons and swans make their homes.

2. Granville Island: Festivals and Farmers' Markets Galore!

Summertime means island time in Vancouver! Spend just a day or return over and over -- Granville Island will charm you with its quaint farmers' markets and extensive marina that's perfect for people watching on a sunny day. The Island has plenty of boutique shops and artist stalls to occupy curious visitors and it's also home to the Granville Island brewing Co. Set up a tour of the brewery and partake in one of the many outdoor events like the Vancouver Fringe Festival and even a concert or two.

3. Museum of Anthropology: Learn More at MoA

Situated within the grounds of the University of British Columbia, the Museum of Anthropology attracts more than just students. It is home to a diverse and global display of arts and culture, tracking the evolution of civilizations through their physical artefacts and cultural practices. MOA pays special attention to capturing Canada's Pacific Northwest and its history of indigenous and First Nations peoples. Expect interactive exhibits, graffiti workshops and oral history demonstrations.

4. Kitsilano Beach: Bring a Beach "Kit" for a Day in the Sun

Clean-sand beaches and the sparkling views of the English Bay are what await beach-goers at Kits beach. Young, old and everyone in between converge here for a day of beach fun. Its popularity is not only because the beach is so immediately accessible by urban-dwellers and visitors alike -- it's also because the beach has the longest swimming pool in Canada, an outdoor saltwater pool (that's also heated!), a playground and several beach volleyball courts. When you're done working up a tan and tossing the Frisbee around, head to the vibrant Boathouse restaurant for some fantastically fresh seafood.

5. Grouse Mountain: Grinding Trails and Stunning Views

The Grouse Grind Trail is what locals know Grouse Mountain best for. Visitors, however, will enjoy at first embarking on the Skyride to the peak of Grouse Mountain. Covered in the winters by a neat cap of snow and in the summers by dense firs and greenery, the mountain is home to grizzly bear habitats and more. Enjoy activities like guided eco-tours, a cinematic viewing of Grouse Mountain's wildlife and tandem paragliding. Then, head to the Skydeck for stunning mountain views and the Altitudes Bistro to chow down after an adventurous day.

Where to Eat in Vancouver

Vancouver is easily Canada’s number one foodie destination and one of the best places to eat out in North America. If you are staying in the center, Japadog (530 Robson St) offers an original fusion of Japanese flavors and traditional hot dogs, Kalypso (1025 Robson St) serve up big portions of great Greek food while Miku (1050 W Hastings St) specializes in Japanese aburi seafood (delicately seared on the outside, but tender inside). Banana Leaf (3005 W Broadway) in Kitsilano cook up superb Malaysian dishes while Vij’s (1480 W 11th Ave) on Granville Island is the best Indian restaurant in town. A high-end meal will cost anything from C$70 to C$200, but good medium price meals can be enjoyed for much less. That’s one of the things that makes Vancouver so great.

When to visit Vancouver

Vancouver in March
Estimated hotel price
$201
1 night at 3-star hotel
Vancouver in March
Estimated hotel price
$201
1 night at 3-star hotel

Summer is a fantastic time to visit Vancouver. The whale-watching season is in full swing, the beaches are inviting, the cycle paths are open, and the whole city is at it's best when the sun shines. There are also summer events like the Pacific National Exhibition (August 20-September 5) at the Playland Amusement Park, which mixes rides, food, and animal shows. Then again, winter brings the chance to hit the slopes at resorts like Whistler, free ice skating on Robson Square, and sales at the city’s fashion stores. Spring sees the suburbs erupt into a riot of pink as the cherry blossom blooms, while during the fall the city hosts its International Film Festival. So there really is no bad time to visit.

Data provided by weatherbase
Temperatures
Temperatures
Average
Celcius (°C)
Data provided by weatherbase

How to Get to Vancouver

Plane

Most visitors to Vancouver will fly into Vancouver International Airport (YVR), which is just to the south of the city. The easiest way to reach the center of town from the airport is by catching the SkyTrain which costs C$14, but there are also taxis and limousine services from the International Terminal as well. Expect a taxi from the airport to cost around C$50. Some visitors may also choose to land at Seattle-Tacoma Airport. In that case, the best route to Vancouver is via direct bus or train, which take about 3 hours.

Train

Many people choose to take the train across Canada or the U.S. Northwest, which includes some of the most beautiful scenery on any rail routes. For travelers coming from California and Washington state, Amtrak provides the Cascades route, which terminates at Vancouver’s Pacific Central Station (1150 Station Street). VIA Rail also run the Canadian rail link to Toronto, while the Rocky Mountaineer service links Vancouver with inland cities like Edmonton and Calgary.

Car

Motorists coming from the east can take Canadian Highway 1, which runs through Kamloops and Calgary, and crosses the Canadian mainland. Those driving from cities on the American west coast can take I-5, while I-90 connects Vancouver with Chicago and cities in the east.

Bus

Traveling by bus is an excellent way to reach Vancouver from locations in the United States. The major operator is Greyhound, which connects the city to Seattle, San Francisco and more distant U.S. destinations and also provides links to Canadian cities like Whitehorse and Edmonton.

Other bus companies running services into Vancouver include:

Quick Coach – Runs express bus services from Seattle Tacoma Airport.

Bolt Bus – Link Vancouver with Seattle and Portland.

Pacific Coach Lines – Runs buses to towns on Victoria Island.

Airports near Vancouver

Airlines serving Vancouver

Lufthansa
Good (1,376 reviews)
United Airlines
Good (2,465 reviews)
American Airlines
Good (3,901 reviews)
KLM
Good (292 reviews)
Air France
Good (298 reviews)
Turkish Airlines
Good (1,074 reviews)
Delta
Excellent (2,656 reviews)
British Airways
Good (938 reviews)
SWISS
Excellent (357 reviews)
Qatar Airways
Good (930 reviews)
Iberia
Good (667 reviews)
Air Canada
Good (640 reviews)
Emirates
Excellent (663 reviews)
Austrian Airlines
Good (196 reviews)
TAP AIR PORTUGAL
Good (370 reviews)
Brussels Airlines
Good (74 reviews)
Scandinavian Airlines
Good (306 reviews)
Finnair
Good (450 reviews)
Singapore Airlines
Good (155 reviews)
LATAM Airlines
Good (630 reviews)
Show more

Where to stay in Vancouver

Vancouver offers plenty of choice for vacationers who want somewhere comfortable to stay. The Holiday Inn (711 W. Broadway) is a good, solid family option in the Downtown area, while you might try the Fairmont (900 W Georgia St) for a luxury alternative. The Victorian Hotel (514 Homer St) offers great value while the Cambie Hostel (515 Seymour Street) is a great choice for backpackers. Suburban hotels worth checking out include the Granville Island Hotel (1253 Johnston St) and Avalon Guest Suite (3015 11th Ave.), located near the beaches in Kitsilano.

Popular neighbourhoods in Vancouver

Vancouver City Center – The cultural and business hub of Vancouver, the city center is the place for art lovers and clubbers to stay if they want to make the most of their time in Vancouver. See the creations of master jeweler Bill Reid at his gallery (639 Hornby St), see elegant Art Deco towers like the Marine Building (355 Burrard St), and decide whether to dine on hearty poutine at Fritz Frie (718 Davie St) or gourmet seafood at Coast (1054 Alberni St).

Gastown – Gastown is the most historic part of Vancouver. It’s filled with attractive Victorian buildings and also hosts Vancouver’s Chinatown, one of the largest and most vibrant in North America. Don’t miss fantastic restaurants like Wild Rice (117 W Pender St) and if you love nightlife, hit the bars on Cambie Street or Alexander Street. There’s plenty to see during the day too, including the unique steam clock on the corner of Water and Cambie Streets and the restful, beautiful Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden (578 Carrall St).

Stanley Park and the West End – With over 400 acres of coastal parkland, Stanley Park is the city’s most relaxing neighborhood. It’s also a center for shoppers, with the markets and craft boutiques on Robson Street and a host of great restaurants on Denman Street. The noodles at Kintaro Ramen (788 Denman St) are particularly popular, but make sure to get there early. In the summer, you can sunbathe on the local beaches, swim in safe saltwater pools, enjoy fireworks displays, and rent bikes to see the coast. For those who love to be outdoors, no part of Vancouver is more appealing.

Most popular hotel in Vancouver by neighbourhood

Where to stay in popular areas of Vancouver

Most booked hotels in Vancouver

Fairmont Vancouver Airport In-Terminal Hotel
Excellent (8.9, Excellent reviews)
$444+
Pan Pacific Vancouver
Excellent (8.4, Excellent reviews)
$461+
Hyatt Regency Vancouver
Excellent (8.4, Excellent reviews)
$339+
The Sutton Place Hotel Vancouver
Excellent (8.3, Excellent reviews)
$271+
Radisson Hotel Vancouver Airport
Excellent (8, Excellent reviews)
$318+
Moda Hotel
Excellent (8, Excellent reviews)
$202+
See all hotels

How to Get Around Vancouver

Public Transportation

The TransLink public transit system should allow you to get where you need to go in Vancouver, with a wide range of buses, trains, and ferry boats to use. Basic fares on all forms of transport are C$4, but day passes are a better option for most visitors and cost C$12. When using the buses, remember that you’ll need to present your ticket or purchase a ticket straight away. You can pay by cash, but the drivers won’t issue change, so be prepared.

Taxis

Taxis are a relatively expensive but convenient way to get around Vancouver. The basic meter drop is C$4 for all journeys, and then C$3 per mile.

Car

Renting a car is a great way to see the city and the surrounding countryside, and most major car rental agencies are represented either at Vancouver Airport or in the suburbs. Expect to pay around C$25-35 per day depending on the vehicle you choose. The roads in Vancouver follow a standard grid system, with horizontal avenues and vertical streets. However, getting into central Vancouver can be a pain, as the downtown area is situated on a peninsula that can only be accessed by bridges. To avoid traffic jams, try to park at outlying stations and avoid driving into the center if you can.

The Cost of Living in Vancouver

Shopping Streets

Vancouver is an excellent place for shoppers to visit. If you enjoy window shopping for leading fashion brands or exploring tiny boutiques, Robson Street should be your first destination. There are big brands like J Crew (no. 1088) along with chain retailers like BCBGMAXAZRIA (no. 1080), and stores selling artisan furniture as well. If handmade souvenirs are your thing, head to Granville Island’s marketplace, while the Punjabi Market in South Vancouver offers an intoxicating selection of food, clothing, and artisan jewelry.

Groceries and Other

Vancouver is relatively cheap compared with major U.S. cities like New York and Los Angeles. 12 eggs cost around C$3.50, a good pair of jeans C$70, and a medium quality bottle of wine is about C$18. You can also save money during your stay by shopping at discount supermarkets like T&T, Safeway, or IGA Marketplace. If you want to shop for fresh fruit and vegetables, Granville Island is the place to go, but there are also organic stores like Whole Foods dotted around the city.

Cheap meal
$18.00
A pair of jeans
$84.95
Single public transport ticket
$3.31
Cappuccino
$4.88
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