Baltimore travel guide

Baltimore Tourism | Baltimore Guide

You're Going to Love Baltimore

Baltimore is often neglected by tourists in favor of the East Coast's other great tourist cities, but this is a big mistake. If you head to this charming, vibrant city, you'll instantly see why.

For a start, you'll smell the irresistible aroma of freshly cooked crabcakes or coddies. Baltimore does seafood like no other American city, and its local specialities are not to be missed.

Alternatively, it could be the unique atmosphere of the city. When you head to an Orioles match or tour the stalls at Lexington Market, you'll feel like a native wherever you go.

There are also centuries of history to explore, not to mention museums, galleries and music venues. It all makes Baltimore an exceptional tourist destination, and one that nobody should overlook.

Top 5 Reasons to Visit Baltimore

The Harbor

Baltimore's harbor area is beautiful and packed with things to do. Kids can enjoy the Aquarium and the Science Center, while everyone can enjoy the chance to board historic ships like the USS Constellation.

The Wire

If you've been thrilled by the HBO series The Wire, why not visit where the action took place? Professional guides give three and a half hour tours of where major scenes were filmed, providing a unique insight into where creator David Simon drew his inspiration.

Seafood

If you love crabcakes, cod fishcakes, and trout, Baltimore is the only place to go. Nowhere on the eastern seaboard makes seafood dishes like Baltimore institutions do. Check out Faidley Seafood or Pierpoint Restaurant for some of the best.

Sports

Whether you love NFL or Major League Baseball, Baltimore is a great sporting city. Check out the Orioles at Camden Yards or the Ravens at the M&T Bank Stadium. The atmosphere will be intense whichever option you choose.

History

Baltimore is one of America's oldest cities, and it's seen a lot of action over the past 250 years. The city was attacked by the British in 1812, became the hub of one of the world's first passenger railways in the 1840s, and pioneered women's rights in the 1890s. Now, it's full of historic sites like the Westminster Burying Ground (home to Edgar Allen Poe's grave), Fort McHenry and City Hall.

What to do in Baltimore

Watch Some Sport

Baltimore is very much a sports mad city, with the Orioles competing in Major League Baseball and the Ravens in the NFL. Depending on which season is in full swing, if you love sports, make a date with either franchise.

Spend a Day at the Harbor

The city of Baltimore is built around its natural harbor, which has recently become a tourist center. The district is full of attractions, from the National Aquarium and the Maryland Science Center (both great attractions for children) to Fort McHenry, which withstood attack by the British in the War of 1812.

Enjoy a Gourmet Tour of the City

No city in America boasts the range of seafood that Baltimore offers, from delicate trout dishes to filling coddies and steamed crabs from the Chesapeake Bay. Head to superb local eateries like Nick's Inner Harbor Seafood to find out what all the fuss is about.

Take The Wire Tour

For TV fans, Baltimore might be most famous as the setting for the Wire, one of the most successful crime series in recent years. Fans can tour locations used in the hit series (which includes a stop for the crabcakes at Faidley's on Lexington Market). However, finish watching first though, as the tour contains major spoilers.

Take a Water Taxi Across the Harbor

It's not all about land tours of Baltimore, either. Some of the best views of the city can be had from the water taxis that stop at the Aquarium, Fell's Point and Fort McHenry. When you head to attractions in the harbor area, be sure to board a boat just for the experience.

Watch Some Sport

Baltimore is very much a sports mad city, with the Orioles competing in Major League Baseball and the Ravens in the NFL. Depending on which season is in full swing, if you love sports, make a date with either franchise.

Spend a Day at the Harbor

The city of Baltimore is built around its natural harbor, which has recently become a tourist center. The district is full of attractions, from the National Aquarium and the Maryland Science Center (both great attractions for children) to Fort McHenry, which withstood attack by the British in the War of 1812.

Enjoy a Gourmet Tour of the City

No city in America boasts the range of seafood that Baltimore offers, from delicate trout dishes to filling coddies and steamed crabs from the Chesapeake Bay. Head to superb local eateries like Nick's Inner Harbor Seafood to find out what all the fuss is about.

Take The Wire Tour

For TV fans, Baltimore might be most famous as the setting for the Wire, one of the most successful crime series in recent years. Fans can tour locations used in the hit series (which includes a stop for the crabcakes at Faidley's on Lexington Market). However, finish watching first though, as the tour contains major spoilers.

Take a Water Taxi Across the Harbor

It's not all about land tours of Baltimore, either. Some of the best views of the city can be had from the water taxis that stop at the Aquarium, Fell's Point and Fort McHenry. When you head to attractions in the harbor area, be sure to board a boat just for the experience.

Where to Eat in Baltimore

Eating is one of Baltimore's greatest highlights, particularly if you love seafood. The city is famed for its steamed crabs, and great places to try them includes Faidley's Seafood, next to Lexington Market and Riptide by the Bay. Pit beef sandwiches are an alternative for meat lovers, and you can find great examples at Chaps Pit Beef and Bo Brooks. Cod fishcakes (coddies) are another specialty, and the best in town are served at Attman's Delicatessen. Expect to pay around $15 for a mid-range meal and $30 or more at a higher-end restaurant.

When to visit Baltimore

Baltimore in January
Estimated hotel price
$177
1 night at 3-star hotel
Baltimore in January
Estimated hotel price
$177
1 night at 3-star hotel

Baltimore can be very cold in winter and wet in spring and autumn, making summer the best time to go. Between late May and early September, the city is warm, and the cultural calendar kicks off. Art fans should be there in July for the Artscape festival, while August sees Druid Hill Park stage the popular StoneSoul Picnic event, featuring leading local hip hop and soul acts.

Data provided by weatherbase
Temperatures
Temperatures
Average
Celcius (°C)
Data provided by weatherbase

How to Get to Baltimore

Plane

The closest airport to the city is Baltimore-Washington International Airport, just a few miles out of town. If you fly into Baltimore-Washington and intend to rent a car, be aware that you'll need to catch a special shuttle bus to the dedicated car rental facility (outlets aren't located in the arrivals terminal as at other airports). There's also a light rail connection into the Downtown area, which costs just $2.

Train

Baltimore's Pennsylvania Station is on a number of Amtrak routes, including the Cardinal (from Chicago to New York via Washington), the Crescent (from New York to New Orleans) and the Palmetto (from New York to Savannah, Georgia). This means you should be able to get there from most eastern cities via rail. The MARC regional rail network also links Baltimore with Washington D.C.

Car

If you are coming from Philadelphia or New York, I-95 is the road to take, and the same road also connects Baltimore with cities in the south such as Atlanta, Richmond, and Miami. I-81 links the city with destinations in the south and west, including New Orleans and Nashville.

Bus

Buses are a convenient way to get to Baltimore from a host of eastern cities. Greyhound is the major operator in the city, with a large station in the Inner Harbor district. However, there are also intercity services provided by Bolt Bus, Apex (exclusively to New York), MVP Bus (to Washington and New York) and Megabus (to many regional cities).

Airlines serving Baltimore

United Airlines
Good (69,536 reviews)
American Airlines
Good (47,709 reviews)
KLM
Good (3,812 reviews)
Delta
Good (30,772 reviews)
Air France
Good (4,368 reviews)
British Airways
Good (23,358 reviews)
Qatar Airways
Excellent (11,557 reviews)
Iberia
Good (6,176 reviews)
Air Canada
Good (25,066 reviews)
Emirates
Excellent (15,787 reviews)
TAP AIR PORTUGAL
Good (5,586 reviews)
Scandinavian Airlines
Good (5,456 reviews)
Alaska Airlines
Excellent (30,361 reviews)
Finnair
Good (3,885 reviews)
JetBlue
Excellent (20,193 reviews)
Air Europa
Good (3,266 reviews)
LATAM Airlines
Good (5,800 reviews)
ITA Airways
Excellent (17 reviews)
Singapore Airlines
Excellent (3,963 reviews)
Aeromexico
Good (9,975 reviews)
Show more

Where to stay in Baltimore

Most tourists choose to stay in the center of Baltimore, usually in the Inner Harbor district which is close to all of the major attractions. If you decide to stay there, check out the InterContinental Harbor Court, which has stunning harbor views, and the Hyatt Regency, which often offers lower rates than other luxury hotels nearby. If you want to stay Downtown, check out SpringHill Suites, which offers self-catering apartments, while budget travelers can stay at HI Baltimore, one of the most popular youth hostels in North America.

Popular neighbourhoods in Baltimore

Inner Harbor – The Inner Harbor is the tourist center of Baltimore and home to attractions like the city's collection of historic ships, the National Aquarium (which houses over 750 different aquatic species) and the Baltimore Convention Center - home to various comic conventions and other events throughout the year. Head to Harbor East for the best food options and don't miss Little Havana, a great Cuban restaurant with delicious food and even better cocktails.

Downtown Baltimore – The business center of the city still has plenty of appeal for tourists. It's home to some of the city's performing arts spaces, including the Hippodrome Theater and the indie venue Sonar Baltimore. It's also where you'll find Lexington Market, the best place in the city to eat street food like gyros, pizza and burritos.

Midtown – The creative center of the city Midtown is a relaxed, safe and attractive place to stay. It contains the town's oldest neighborhoods, such as Mount Vernon along with the Station North Arts District, home to the best theaters, music venues like the Lyric Opera House and Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. It's a great place to eat as well, thanks to street food joints like Sofi's Crepes and Iggie's Pizza.

Most popular hotel in Baltimore by neighbourhood

Where to stay in popular areas of Baltimore

Most booked hotels in Baltimore

Sagamore Pendry Baltimore
Excellent (8.9, Excellent reviews)
$663+
Holiday Inn Baltimore BWI Airport
Excellent (8.7, Excellent reviews)
$144+
Hotel Indigo Baltimore Downtown
Excellent (8.6, Excellent reviews)
$264+
Hilton Baltimore BWI Airport
Excellent (8.5, Excellent reviews)
$220+
Hyatt Regency Baltimore Inner Harbor
Excellent (8.4, Excellent reviews)
$312+
The Westin Baltimore Washington Airport - Bwi
Excellent (8.2, Excellent reviews)
$208+
See all hotels

How to Get Around Baltimore

Public Transportation

Public transit in Baltimore is provided by the Maryland Transit Authority (MTA) and isn't particularly reliable or extensive. At $4 for a daily pass, it isn't that expensive, though, and there are some handy light rail and bus routes. For example, you might want to park your car at Camden Yards and take the train from there, avoiding the need for expensive city center parking. There are also a couple of inner-city bus routes known as the Charm City Circulator. These are free of charge and are really useful for skipping between the Inner Harbor, Downtown and areas like Fells Point.

Taxis

Taxis are a convenient and affordable way to get around Baltimore. Most companies have a meter drop of $1.80, then around $2.40 for each mile after that. Uber can work out much cheaper, with a basic rate of $1 and then $1.15 per mile. if you get the chance, check out the water taxis in the harbor area as well (which cost $9 for a day pass).

Car

Driving in Baltimore shouldn't pose too many problems, and unlike many major cities, finding parking spots isn't usually difficult. However, the price of parking can be high in the very center of town, so think about parking outside the center and commuting in if you need to save money.

The Cost of Living in Baltimore

Shopping Streets

Baltimore has some fantastic areas to shop, with a wide range of craft stores, boutiques and international brands to visit. There are standard malls like Arundel Mills, where the stores include Disney, H&M, and Old Navy. Closer to the center of town, the Gallery Mall at Harborplace features plenty of major chains like Banana Republic and Forever 21, while if you want arts and crafts products, head to Midtown outlets like Utrecht Art Supplies and Beadazzled.

Groceries and Other

Easily the most fun place to shop for groceries in Baltimore is Lexington Market. Established way back in 1782, Lexington Market sells a huge array of fruit and vegetables, preserves, seafood, and meat. However, for more standard groceries, head to supermarkets like Harvest Fare Save-a-Lot and Whole Foods, which can be found all across the city. Prices aren't too high. Expect to pay $3.80 for a gallon of milk and $2.80 for 12 eggs.

Cheap meal
$23.28
A pair of jeans
$67.56
Single public transport ticket
$2.64
Cappuccino
$5.44
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