Natchez travel guide

Natchez Tourism | Natchez Guide

You're Going to Love Natchez

Centuries of history live in Natchez, including hundreds of Antebellum mansions - most of them in pristine condition - along with museums and monuments of Native American and African American history. It's a small city with a big heart, sitting on the highest bluff along the Mississippi River in a beautiful location made for nature lovers. Explore the Old, Old South, including the culture that gave birth to the blues.

Top 5 Reasons to Visit Natchez

1. Antebellum Architecture

Natchez is home to the finest collection of Antebellum homes - 668 in total - many of which are open for tours all year round, along with the "Natchez Pilgrimage," a semi-annual event that sees private homes open to the public.

2. Natchez Under-the-Hill

This area located below the bluff along the Mississippi River at the end of State Street is where you will find the remnants of the city's wilder past, including an old-style saloon and casino.

3. Natchez Trace Parkway

The 444-mile Natchez Trace Parkway begins in Nashville and ends in Natchez, following the ancient route used by Native Americans, colonists, and others. Today it's a picturesque route used for cycling, hiking, camping, and more.

4. Historic Downtown

Explore centuries of history in the city, including the Natchez Museum of African American History and Culture, 128-acre Grand Village of the Natchez Indians, and a beautifully maintained historic downtown perfect for walking tours.

5. The Music

Along with the rest of the state, Natchez is where American music began, from the music of the Natchez Indians to the songs of the African American slaves, and the birth of the blues. The city is on the Gold Record Road, with historical Blues Trail markers you can check out via the Visitor's Center.

What to do in Natchez

1. An Oriental Villa

Take a tour of the 1860 octagonal mansion designed by Mississippi natives Haller & Julia Nutt. You'll marvel at the detached kitchen named, "Necessary". Then, roam through the pre-Civil War "servant quarters", a three-story brick building that housed the Nutt's slaves, including cooks, maids, and nannies. Examine the basement where the family lived during the mansion's construction and walk over to the upper floors unfinished due to the Civil War. As you stroll on the property, you'll see the former vegetable garden, privy, and cemetery.

2. Civil War Memorial

Established in 1822, this cemetery dates back to the Civil War. Stroll the contoured grounds of the graveyard and marvel at the 19th and early 20th century ironwork, mausoleum doors, artistically decorated benches and the majestically sculpted marble monuments, many of which are the work of the talented antebellum sculptors Edwin Lyon and Robert Rawes. Visit the grave of Ruphus E. Case, whose last wish was to be buried in his rocking chair facing his home state of Louisiana, or walk over to pay your respects to Captain Thomas P. Leathers, a steamboat captain who raced in 1870 with Robert E. Lee on the Mississippi River.

3. "Cotton-Kingdom"

Take the Ranger Ted Tour of the 1841 Greek revival-styled plantation known as the "Cotton-Kingdom". Built by the McMurran family, this mansion has remained intact since its pre-Civil War days. The 80-acre historically preserved estate is maintained by the National Park Service. As you stroll this antebellum southern estate, the unchanged landscape encompassing the property will take you back in time. Learn about pre-Civil War culture and examine the furnished slave cabin and exhibits. Tour the formal and informal gardens. You'll step back into the days of the Old South.

4. State Street Estate

As you explore this estate, the structure reveals the use of bricks salvaged from houses destroyed by the notorious 1840 tornado. William Johnson established his State Street estate, adjacent to the McCallum House as both a home and a commercial hub. The Johnsons lived in the upper stories and rented out their first floor to merchants. As you tour the home, discover William Johnson's diary documenting his life from 1835-1851. His journal provides a fascinating insight into the Pre-Civil War South. Johnson was a free-African American living in the antebellum South.

5. Fatherland Site

Once the traditional territory of the Natchez people, this historic 128-acre landmark has been preserved by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. Marvel at the reconstructed Natchez Indian house and 3 ceremonial mounds. View the magnificent structures of the Great Sun and Temple Mounds, which were excavated and restored to their original dimensions and layouts. In the museum you can discover Natchez culture and history, and learn about the new nature trail and yearly traditional Natchez Powwow.

1. An Oriental Villa

Take a tour of the 1860 octagonal mansion designed by Mississippi natives Haller & Julia Nutt. You'll marvel at the detached kitchen named, "Necessary". Then, roam through the pre-Civil War "servant quarters", a three-story brick building that housed the Nutt's slaves, including cooks, maids, and nannies. Examine the basement where the family lived during the mansion's construction and walk over to the upper floors unfinished due to the Civil War. As you stroll on the property, you'll see the former vegetable garden, privy, and cemetery.

2. Civil War Memorial

Established in 1822, this cemetery dates back to the Civil War. Stroll the contoured grounds of the graveyard and marvel at the 19th and early 20th century ironwork, mausoleum doors, artistically decorated benches and the majestically sculpted marble monuments, many of which are the work of the talented antebellum sculptors Edwin Lyon and Robert Rawes. Visit the grave of Ruphus E. Case, whose last wish was to be buried in his rocking chair facing his home state of Louisiana, or walk over to pay your respects to Captain Thomas P. Leathers, a steamboat captain who raced in 1870 with Robert E. Lee on the Mississippi River.

3. "Cotton-Kingdom"

Take the Ranger Ted Tour of the 1841 Greek revival-styled plantation known as the "Cotton-Kingdom". Built by the McMurran family, this mansion has remained intact since its pre-Civil War days. The 80-acre historically preserved estate is maintained by the National Park Service. As you stroll this antebellum southern estate, the unchanged landscape encompassing the property will take you back in time. Learn about pre-Civil War culture and examine the furnished slave cabin and exhibits. Tour the formal and informal gardens. You'll step back into the days of the Old South.

4. State Street Estate

As you explore this estate, the structure reveals the use of bricks salvaged from houses destroyed by the notorious 1840 tornado. William Johnson established his State Street estate, adjacent to the McCallum House as both a home and a commercial hub. The Johnsons lived in the upper stories and rented out their first floor to merchants. As you tour the home, discover William Johnson's diary documenting his life from 1835-1851. His journal provides a fascinating insight into the Pre-Civil War South. Johnson was a free-African American living in the antebellum South.

5. Fatherland Site

Once the traditional territory of the Natchez people, this historic 128-acre landmark has been preserved by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. Marvel at the reconstructed Natchez Indian house and 3 ceremonial mounds. View the magnificent structures of the Great Sun and Temple Mounds, which were excavated and restored to their original dimensions and layouts. In the museum you can discover Natchez culture and history, and learn about the new nature trail and yearly traditional Natchez Powwow.

Where to Eat in Natchez

Dine on Cajun, Creole, and American favorites in the charms of yesteryear at Restaurant 1818, located in the Monmouth Historic Inn. Main dishes start at $20. The Cotton Alley Café offers contemporary takes on American, Cajun, and Creole cuisine, with mains starting at $14.

When to visit Natchez

Natchez in January
Estimated hotel price
$147
1 night at 3-star hotel
Natchez in January
Estimated hotel price
$147
1 night at 3-star hotel

With a subtropical climate, Natchez is a year-round destination where temperatures range from about 60 degrees from December to February, to between 85 and 92 degrees during the summer from May to October.

Data provided by weatherbase
Temperatures
Temperatures
Average
Celcius (°C)
Data provided by weatherbase

How to Get to Natchez

Plane

The closest airport is the Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport (BTR), about 85 miles south of the city. There is one bus per day to Natchez, so your most convenient option is renting a car and driving to the city.

Car

There are extensive highway connections to and from Natchez, including the I-10 to Baton Rouge, the I-20 to Vicksburg, and I-49 to Alexandria, Louisiana.

Bus

Greyhound is the major carrier connecting Natchez to other centers in the region, including Baton Rouge and New Orleans.

Airlines serving Natchez

United Airlines
Good (2,640 reviews)
Lufthansa
Good (1,799 reviews)
American Airlines
Good (4,105 reviews)
KLM
Good (314 reviews)
Air France
Good (361 reviews)
British Airways
Good (1,159 reviews)
Delta
Excellent (2,836 reviews)
Qatar Airways
Good (1,035 reviews)
Iberia
Good (789 reviews)
Air Canada
Good (1,012 reviews)
Alaska Airlines
Excellent (2,296 reviews)
ITA Airways
Good (71 reviews)
Aeromexico
Good (819 reviews)
ANA
Excellent (115 reviews)
Southwest
Good (1,537 reviews)
Korean Air
Excellent (181 reviews)
Copa Airlines
Good (487 reviews)
Gulf Air
Good (50 reviews)
Qantas Airways
Good (133 reviews)
Virgin Atlantic
Good (281 reviews)
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Where to stay in Natchez

City Center - here, you can stroll the streets to admire the ornate historic architecture and enjoy a stop at a restaurant or cafe.

Popular Neighborhoods in Natchez

Kingston & Cranfield - this is where you will find the Natchez National Historical Park, including historic mansions, along with exhibits that detail the life of the Natchez Indians who gave the city its name.

Cloverdale - enjoy the great outdoors at the St. Catherine Creek National Wildlife Refuge, southwest of the downtown area.

Where to stay in popular areas of Natchez

Most booked hotels in Natchez

Magnolia Bluffs Casino Hotel, Bw Premier Collection
Excellent (8.6, Excellent reviews)
$167+
Natchez Grand Hotel
Excellent (8.4, Excellent reviews)
$201+
The Elms Bed and Breakfast
Poor (0, Poor reviews)
$946+
Dunleith Historic Inn
Poor (0, Poor reviews)
$280+
Days Inn by Wyndham Natchez
Good (6.1, Good reviews)
$150+
Super 8 by Wyndham Natchez
Okay (5.2, Okay reviews)
$118+
See all hotels

How to Get Around Natchez

Public Transportation

Natchez Regional Transit provides bus service through the city and around the region. Fares start at $1.50.

Taxi

There is some taxi service available in town, although it is not extensive. Fares within the downtown area should average $5 - $10.

Car

Although you can walk through the downtown area, a car rental is probably the best way to explore the area.

The Cost of Living in Natchez

Shopping Streets

You'll find a scene of small shops and boutiques in the downtown area. On the second Saturday of each month, the Second Saturday celebrations include extended store hours, music, entertainment and more.

Groceries and Other

Smoot's Grocery and the Uptown Grocery and Deli are located in the city center, with a Walmart Supercenter near highway 61. A gallon of milk costs about $3.50 and a dozen eggs approximately $3.

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