Sedona travel guide

Sedona Tourism | Sedona Guide

You're Going to Love Sedona

Sedona is known for its beauty and magnificent red-rock setting. With over 4 million people visiting each year, it's one of the most popular destinations in Arizona, second only to the Grand Canyon.

There is always something to do in Sedona, whether it's a music festival, art exhibition or new age event. Visit for annual festivals or enjoy a weekly selection of local events.

The city is a haven for new age practitioners who are drawn to its unique location on four vortices. Whether you are planning a long vacation or a short break, there are lots of terrific reasons to visit Sedona.

Top 5 Reasons to Visit Sedona

1. A truly magnificent setting

Amazing rock formations, unique wildlife and fabulous panoramic vistas attract thousands of visitors to Sedona each year. The city is close to the Red Rock State Park and surrounded by the Coconino National Forest - if you experience a sense of deja-vu it's probably because Sedona's stunning red rock backdrop has appeared in over 70 films!

2. Shop for Exclusive Arts & Crafts

Tlaquepaque Arts & Crafts Village is a unique complex that is home to over 45 specialty shops and 19 galleries. Created in the image of an authentic Mexican market over 40 years ago, Tlaquepaque is now one of Sedona's best-loved attractions.

3. Hiking in the Great Outdoors

Walking, hiking and mountain biking are popular pursuits - particularly near some of the most distinctive red-rock buttes like Cathedral Rock, Bear Mountain, Bell Rock and Courthouse Rock

4. Terrific Events Throughout the Year

The town hosts several major events and festivals each year including the Sedona Arts Festival, the Sedona Jazz Festival, and the Sedona International Film Festival.

5. A Unique New Age Welcome

Locals are known for their liberal attitude and visitors from around the globe always receive a warm welcome. New age culture is a predominant feature of the city - try alternative therapies and treatments or simply explore new-age philosophies.

What to do in Sedona

1. Chapel of the Holy Cross: A Masterpiece of Desert Architecture

One of the most stunning churches in all of North America, the Chapel of the Holy Cross was carved out of the buttes just south of Sedona. Although its roots lie in the Art Deco movement of the 1930s, the Chapel feels like it could have been built yesterday, or five thousand years ago, so naturally does it fit the landscape of Red Rock Country. Be sure to make the climb past the flowering desert cacti along the stepped walkway to one of the finest views Sedona has to offer.

2. Cathedral Rock: A Stunning Sandstone Landmark

The Chapel of the Holy Cross isn't the only sacred space in Sedona that visitors simply have to visit. As the name suggests, Cathedral Rock is just as inspiring - although it wasn't made by hand. Situated a few miles southwest of the Chapel, the church-shaped sandstone rock soars from the Cocopino Forest and can be reached relatively easily via the Cathedral Rock Trail. But even if you stick to taking snapshots from the trailhead, the short drive from Sedona is well worth it.

3. V-Bar-V Heritage Site: The Oldest Art Gallery in Arizona

Located next to Lake Montezuma not far south of Sedona, the V-Bar-V Heritage site is a must for visitors with an interest in ancient history. That's because it contains one of the most impressive collections of petroglyphs (images carved into stone) anywhere in the world. Made almost 1,000 years ago, the artworks focus on the region's animal life in the "Beaver Creek Style". They can be seen between Friday and Monday all year-round, and the Verde Valley Archaeological Society provides guided tours to shed more light on these mysterious images.

4. Slide Rock State Park: Family Fun in the Arizona Sun

Red Rock Country is packed with natural wonders, but Slide Rock State Park is one of the most relaxing to visit. Situated on a preserved homestead in Oak Creek Canyon north of Sedona, the park is managed by the U.S. Forest Service and offers a mix of family fun and sheer tranquility. The star of the show is Oak Creek, which is among one of America's 10 best swimming holes and features an exhilarating 80-foot-long rock slide, which deposits visitors straight into a sandstone pool. Nothing could be more refreshing in the Arizona heat - just remember to pack your towel.

5. Devil's Bridge: An Astonishing Sandstone Arch

A breathtaking natural sandstone arch, Devil's Bridge is another unmissable desert site in the Sedona area. Reachable via a one-mile trail from its own dedicated car park, the bridge is set in a beautiful patch of Arizona wilderness, where manzanita bloom, Steller's jays show off their dazzling blue bellies overhead, and you'll be sharing the range with bears, mountain lions, and elk (although they tend to stay away from the trail). In terms of photo opportunities, nothing comes close in Red Rock Country.

1. Chapel of the Holy Cross: A Masterpiece of Desert Architecture

One of the most stunning churches in all of North America, the Chapel of the Holy Cross was carved out of the buttes just south of Sedona. Although its roots lie in the Art Deco movement of the 1930s, the Chapel feels like it could have been built yesterday, or five thousand years ago, so naturally does it fit the landscape of Red Rock Country. Be sure to make the climb past the flowering desert cacti along the stepped walkway to one of the finest views Sedona has to offer.

2. Cathedral Rock: A Stunning Sandstone Landmark

The Chapel of the Holy Cross isn't the only sacred space in Sedona that visitors simply have to visit. As the name suggests, Cathedral Rock is just as inspiring - although it wasn't made by hand. Situated a few miles southwest of the Chapel, the church-shaped sandstone rock soars from the Cocopino Forest and can be reached relatively easily via the Cathedral Rock Trail. But even if you stick to taking snapshots from the trailhead, the short drive from Sedona is well worth it.

3. V-Bar-V Heritage Site: The Oldest Art Gallery in Arizona

Located next to Lake Montezuma not far south of Sedona, the V-Bar-V Heritage site is a must for visitors with an interest in ancient history. That's because it contains one of the most impressive collections of petroglyphs (images carved into stone) anywhere in the world. Made almost 1,000 years ago, the artworks focus on the region's animal life in the "Beaver Creek Style". They can be seen between Friday and Monday all year-round, and the Verde Valley Archaeological Society provides guided tours to shed more light on these mysterious images.

4. Slide Rock State Park: Family Fun in the Arizona Sun

Red Rock Country is packed with natural wonders, but Slide Rock State Park is one of the most relaxing to visit. Situated on a preserved homestead in Oak Creek Canyon north of Sedona, the park is managed by the U.S. Forest Service and offers a mix of family fun and sheer tranquility. The star of the show is Oak Creek, which is among one of America's 10 best swimming holes and features an exhilarating 80-foot-long rock slide, which deposits visitors straight into a sandstone pool. Nothing could be more refreshing in the Arizona heat - just remember to pack your towel.

5. Devil's Bridge: An Astonishing Sandstone Arch

A breathtaking natural sandstone arch, Devil's Bridge is another unmissable desert site in the Sedona area. Reachable via a one-mile trail from its own dedicated car park, the bridge is set in a beautiful patch of Arizona wilderness, where manzanita bloom, Steller's jays show off their dazzling blue bellies overhead, and you'll be sharing the range with bears, mountain lions, and elk (although they tend to stay away from the trail). In terms of photo opportunities, nothing comes close in Red Rock Country.

Where to Eat in Sedona

Dining in Sedona is big news, you'll find restaurants offering hearty family fare as well as nationally acclaimed establishments specializing in international cuisine. Enjoy affordable meals at Picazzo Pizza or push the boat out at Shugrues where you'll love the view from the patio.

Try one of the 101 types of omelet offered by the famous Coffee Pot Restaurant on South West Drive. This friendly, historic establishment is a local institution that has appeared on the Food Network and the Travel Channel. Tuck into sizzling steaks at the Cowboy Club Grille on N Hwy 89A or sample some of the best gourmet hot dogs in Arizona at Simon's Hot Dogs which you'll find inside the Oak Creek Brewery on Yavapai Drive.

When to visit Sedona

Sedona in August
Estimated hotel price
$330
1 night at 3-star hotel
Sedona in August
Estimated hotel price
$330
1 night at 3-star hotel

Sedona has a temperate semi-arid climate with warm to hot summers and mild winters. The city can be very hot in summer with temperatures reaching the mid-90s. Spring and Fall are peak travel seasons in Sedona and visitors enjoy temperatures ranging from 65F to 83F between April and June and September and November. Winter is another great time for a vacation in Sedona. Nights may be cold but festive events and illuminations at Tlaquepaque and at the Los Abrigados Resort ensure that there is still plenty of fun to be had in the city. It occasionally snows in Sedona but skiers and snowboarders can find abundant snow, great facilities and marked slopes at nearby Flagstaff.

Data provided by weatherbase
Temperatures
Temperatures
Average
Celcius (°C)
Data provided by weatherbase

How to Get to Sedona

Plane

Owing to the fact Sedona is only served by one small local airport, many visitors fly to Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (IATA: PHX). The shuttle bus service from the airport to Sedona takes 3 hours. Many people choose to rent a car - it's just a 90-minute drive from the airport, and you can go directly to your hotel or apartment.

Train

Although there are no trains to Sedona, there are regular Amtrak services to Phoenix from most major cities in the US. Travelers can then board a train from Phoenix to Flagstaff. Arizona Shuttle runs a bus service between Flagstaff and Sedona.

Car

A car is a real advantage for any trip to Sedona, whether you are arriving in Phoenix by plane and intend to rent a car or whether you are driving from another part of the country. Drivers can take Interstate 17 north from Phoenix and then Exit 298 for Sedona-Oak Creek Canyon. It's then just 7 miles on State Road 179 to Oak Creek Village and then another 7 miles from there to Sedona - SR 179 is Arizona's first "All-American Road" and this scenic route is considered an attraction in itself. You can also take the I-17 from Flagstaff or choose Highway 89A - the view is spectacular, but the road's multiple switchbacks, minimal shoulder area, and steep drops require careful driving.

Bus

It is possible to travel to Sedona by bus from many major cities using services provided by national carriers like Greyhound. However, there are likely to be several changes en-route and most buses stop at Phoenix Airport to allow passengers to take the Arizona Shuttle service for the final leg of their journey.

Airlines serving Sedona

Lufthansa
Good (1,419 reviews)
United Airlines
Good (2,476 reviews)
American Airlines
Good (3,907 reviews)
KLM
Good (293 reviews)
Air France
Good (304 reviews)
Turkish Airlines
Good (1,080 reviews)
Delta
Excellent (2,669 reviews)
British Airways
Good (952 reviews)
SWISS
Excellent (367 reviews)
Qatar Airways
Good (950 reviews)
Iberia
Good (679 reviews)
Air Canada
Good (656 reviews)
Emirates
Excellent (668 reviews)
Austrian Airlines
Good (203 reviews)
TAP AIR PORTUGAL
Good (381 reviews)
Brussels Airlines
Good (73 reviews)
Scandinavian Airlines
Good (311 reviews)
Etihad Airways
Good (207 reviews)
Finnair
Good (461 reviews)
Singapore Airlines
Excellent (164 reviews)
Show more

Where to stay in Sedona

Accommodation is plentiful and ranges from budget to luxury. Most of Sedona's upmarket spa hotels can be found along the banks of Oak Creek and on the mountainsides. The Enchantment Resort, Hyatt Pinon Pointe, and Sedona Golf Resort are popular with golfers who want to be near Canyon Mesa Country Club and Oak Creek Country Club as well as visitors who want easy access to the city's unique arts and entertainment venues. Affordable Uptown hotels are ideal for families and groups - you'll still have spectacular views and be close to most of the main landmarks and attractions.

Popular neighbourhoods in Sedona

Uptown Sedona – the Uptown area is located near Bear Wallow Canyon. Notable landmarks include the Sedona Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center and many of the city's galleries, restaurants and shops can be found here.

Oak Creek – the Oak Creek district is south of the city center. Expect to find everything from luxurious spa resorts to rustic cabin accommodation in an area that's defined by the waterfalls and creeks of the Oak Creek Canyon river gorge.

West Sedona – there really isn't a part of the city that doesn't boast impressive views and exciting attractions. West Sedona is more residential than Uptown or Oak Creek and is a great choice for visitors who want a home from home experience.

Where to stay in popular areas of Sedona

Most booked hotels in Sedona

Orchards Inn
Excellent (8.4, Excellent reviews)
$328+
Cedars Resort
Excellent (8.3, Excellent reviews)
$269+
Ridge on Sedona Golf Resort by Diamond Resorts
Excellent (8.2, Excellent reviews)
$169+
Los Abrigados Resort And Spa By Diamond Resorts
Excellent (8.1, Excellent reviews)
$225+
Hilton Sedona Resort at Bell Rock
Excellent (8, Excellent reviews)
$442+
Poco Diablo Resort
Good (7.7, Good reviews)
$356+
See all hotels

How to Get Around Sedona

Public Transportation

Sedona isn't a big city but it is fairly spread out. Local shuttle services ferry passengers to Phoenix Airport or Red Rock State Park and most can be boarded at the Chapel of the Holy Cross. There is also a trolly service which is a must for visitors.

Taxi

Taxis are available, but they can prove an expensive way to get around. Many of the best trails can just as easily be reached by car or shuttle bus.

Car

Whether you plan a long or short stay, a car can make a big difference. You can organize trips to iconic landmarks like the Grand Canyon or simply see the city at your own pace. Car rental offices can be found at Phoenix Airport as well as Phoenix and Flagstaff.

The Cost of Living in Sedona

Sedona's Hottest Shopping Streets

Satisfy your craving for crystals or pick up unique pieces by artisans at Tlaquepaque. This exceptional shopping and gallery complex offers a wide range of options in a beautiful setting. Look out for t-shirts and clothing that have been dyed red using the region's famous rocks.

Groceries and other necessities

While you'll discover dozens of organic stores and food shops, Sedona isn't somewhere that has been taken over by supermarket chains. However, you can pick up food and basics from Bashas in Coffee Pot Drive or from Whole Foods Market on W State Road 89A.

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