Burgas travel guide

Burgas Tourism | Burgas Guide

You're Going to Love Burgas

Underrated, modest, but hard to resist, the Black Sea city of Burgas is one of Bulgaria's most intriguing destinations. With natural attractions, museums, and fine food, it has more than enough to keep vacationers interested during their stays.

Top 5 Reasons to Visit Burgas

1. Natural Beauty within the City Limits

The Burgas Lakes are just outside the city center, and offer some stunning vistas, Roman ruins, and bathing opportunities in the saline waters.

2. Excellent Museums

Learn about the ancient history of Burgas at the Archaeological Museum, or head to other museums featuring Bulgarian costumes, local wildlife, and handcrafted jewelry.

3. Beautiful Religious Architecture

Burgas has some spellbinding churches to visit, including the Surp Hach Armenian Church and the Saints Cyril and Methodius Church, with its stunning interior murals.

4. Black Sea Beaches

Burgas is also the kind of city where you can transition seamlessly from museums to beach resorts like Sunny Beach, just 20 miles to the north.

5. The Spirit of Burgas Festival

Every August, Spirit of Burgas takes place on the city beach and attracts world-famous pop and electronic dance acts (along with 50,000 revelers).

What to do in Burgas

1. Sea Gardens: Culture on the Coastline

The Sea Gardens, built by landscape artist Georgi Duhtev in 1910, are considered among the most beautiful parks in Bulgaria. With a wide variety of exotic plants from around the globe, this seaside park lies on 150 acres of coastline. Among the attractions visitors will find the Sea Casino, a cultural and recreational center; the Snail, an open-air amphitheater that hosts nightly performances; and a number of sculptures. Annual festivals include Flora, an international flower show; the Burgas and the Sea Song Contest, the International Folklore Festival; the Spirit of Burgas Music Festival; and the Turn on the City Contemporary Art Festival.

2. Lake Atanasovsko: Free Spa Experience

Lake Atanasovsko is world-famous for its black mud and lye pools, which are said to have healing properties. A free outdoor spa, the lake contains silicates, sand, gypsum, iron, aluminum compounds, hydroxides and salts, which have resulted from centuries of natural fruition. Lake Atanasovsko is said to possess thermal properties that reduce swelling and pain, heal wounds and minimize scarring. The lake is especially recommended for those suffering from skin afflictions, such as arthritis and plexitis, as it supplies calcium, iodine and phosphorus to the skin. The area is also known for its hundreds of migrating bird species.

3. Poda Protected Area: Natural Bulgarian Wonders

The Poda Protected Area is a nature reserve that displays a variety of natural wonders. Visitors are invited to view the permanent exhibition, which showcases the biological diversity of Bulgaria, including hundreds of plant, fish and amphibian species. The area is also renowned for its migrating birds, which include the Eurasian spoonbill and the great cormorant. Via Pontica is Europe's second largest migration route crosses the Poda. In winter, bird watchers can observe endangered species such as the pygmy cormorant, the Dalmatian pelican and the white-headed duck. The reserve is also home to the eastern four-lined snake, the largest in Bulgaria, the Etruscan shrew, the smallest European mammal, and the endangered otter.

4. St. Anastasia Island: Shrouded in Medieval Legend

St. Anastasia Island in Burgas Bay in the Black Sea is a volcanic rock island that stands 12 meters high. Spread over two acres, the island is shrouded in mystery and legend. It is said that when pirates attempted to raid the island, the monks living in the monastery prayed to St. Anastasia for help. She answered their call by sending a storm that split the pirate ship in two. The remains of the vessel are still visible in fossilized rock. Among the attractions on the island are the 15th century church that houses numerous Medieval murals, the lighthouse built in 1889 by a French company, and the hotel and restaurant that features authentic Burgas cuisine.

5. Ethnographic Museum Burgas: Steeped in Old World Tradition

The Ethnographic Museum near the Saints Cyril and Methodius Cathedral is housed in a 19th century palazzo. Showcasing traditional Burgas cultural artifacts, the museum is highly-regarded for its collection of costumes including those linked to popular celebrations such as the nestinarka, kuker, enyova bulya and lazarka. The museum is a historical gallery that works to preserve the region's archaeological, ethnographic, and natural history. Visitors are also welcome to view the center's jewelry, furniture, and weaving collections.

1. Sea Gardens: Culture on the Coastline

The Sea Gardens, built by landscape artist Georgi Duhtev in 1910, are considered among the most beautiful parks in Bulgaria. With a wide variety of exotic plants from around the globe, this seaside park lies on 150 acres of coastline. Among the attractions visitors will find the Sea Casino, a cultural and recreational center; the Snail, an open-air amphitheater that hosts nightly performances; and a number of sculptures. Annual festivals include Flora, an international flower show; the Burgas and the Sea Song Contest, the International Folklore Festival; the Spirit of Burgas Music Festival; and the Turn on the City Contemporary Art Festival.

2. Lake Atanasovsko: Free Spa Experience

Lake Atanasovsko is world-famous for its black mud and lye pools, which are said to have healing properties. A free outdoor spa, the lake contains silicates, sand, gypsum, iron, aluminum compounds, hydroxides and salts, which have resulted from centuries of natural fruition. Lake Atanasovsko is said to possess thermal properties that reduce swelling and pain, heal wounds and minimize scarring. The lake is especially recommended for those suffering from skin afflictions, such as arthritis and plexitis, as it supplies calcium, iodine and phosphorus to the skin. The area is also known for its hundreds of migrating bird species.

3. Poda Protected Area: Natural Bulgarian Wonders

The Poda Protected Area is a nature reserve that displays a variety of natural wonders. Visitors are invited to view the permanent exhibition, which showcases the biological diversity of Bulgaria, including hundreds of plant, fish and amphibian species. The area is also renowned for its migrating birds, which include the Eurasian spoonbill and the great cormorant. Via Pontica is Europe's second largest migration route crosses the Poda. In winter, bird watchers can observe endangered species such as the pygmy cormorant, the Dalmatian pelican and the white-headed duck. The reserve is also home to the eastern four-lined snake, the largest in Bulgaria, the Etruscan shrew, the smallest European mammal, and the endangered otter.

4. St. Anastasia Island: Shrouded in Medieval Legend

St. Anastasia Island in Burgas Bay in the Black Sea is a volcanic rock island that stands 12 meters high. Spread over two acres, the island is shrouded in mystery and legend. It is said that when pirates attempted to raid the island, the monks living in the monastery prayed to St. Anastasia for help. She answered their call by sending a storm that split the pirate ship in two. The remains of the vessel are still visible in fossilized rock. Among the attractions on the island are the 15th century church that houses numerous Medieval murals, the lighthouse built in 1889 by a French company, and the hotel and restaurant that features authentic Burgas cuisine.

5. Ethnographic Museum Burgas: Steeped in Old World Tradition

The Ethnographic Museum near the Saints Cyril and Methodius Cathedral is housed in a 19th century palazzo. Showcasing traditional Burgas cultural artifacts, the museum is highly-regarded for its collection of costumes including those linked to popular celebrations such as the nestinarka, kuker, enyova bulya and lazarka. The museum is a historical gallery that works to preserve the region's archaeological, ethnographic, and natural history. Visitors are also welcome to view the center's jewelry, furniture, and weaving collections.

Where to Eat in Burgas

Seafood is Burgas' specialty, with high-class eateries like Neptun and Ethno standing out. Rose is also a great place for grilled meats. Expect to spend around лв20-30 on a meal.

When to visit Burgas

Burgas in March
Estimated hotel price
$61
1 night at 3-star hotel
Burgas in March
Estimated hotel price
$61
1 night at 3-star hotel

Summer is definitely Burgas' best season. You can head there during festival season, or visit in July, when the lakes will be at their most inviting and the temperatures will hardly dip below 80 degrees.

Data provided by weatherbase
Temperatures
Temperatures
Average
Celcius (°C)
Data provided by weatherbase

How to Get to Burgas

Plane

Burgas Airport (BOJ) has connections to hubs like London and Moscow. From there, take the 15 bus, which costs лв1 and takes half an hour.

Train

Burgas has excellent rail connections to Sofia, as well as Romanian and Russian destinations (and resorts along the Black Sea coast).

Car

The A1 runs from Sofia to Burgas, while the E87 follows the coast from Varna to the north.

Bus

Eurolines runs international buses into Burgas city center. Buses terminate at the Central Bus Station (South), a short walk from the main hotels and attractions.

Airports near Burgas

Airlines serving Burgas

Lufthansa
Good (2,433 reviews)
Air France
Good (450 reviews)
Turkish Airlines
Good (1,425 reviews)
SWISS
Good (498 reviews)
Qatar Airways
Good (1,351 reviews)
Austrian Airlines
Good (298 reviews)
Ryanair
Good (1,891 reviews)
Aer Lingus
Good (474 reviews)
easyJet
Good (646 reviews)
Aegean Airlines
Excellent (197 reviews)
Eurowings
Good (103 reviews)
Norwegian
Good (74 reviews)
Air Serbia
Good (41 reviews)
Wizz Air
Good (436 reviews)
airBaltic
Good (52 reviews)
Luxair
Excellent (15 reviews)
Volotea
Good (169 reviews)
Wizz Air UK
Okay (43 reviews)
Smartwings
Good (10 reviews)
Jet2
Excellent (38 reviews)
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Where to stay in Burgas

City Center - the heart of the city, the center is home to all three of the major museums and most of the city's shopping areas.

Popular Neighborhoods in Burgas

The Sea Garden - running for miles along the Black Sea coast, the Sea Garden is a concert venue, park, and a wonderful place to relax.

Meden Rudnik - a relatively new neighborhood, Meden Rudnik is right next to Burgas Lakes, and is a handy base if you want to explore that beautiful region.

Where to stay in popular areas of Burgas

Most booked hotels in Burgas

Hotel Bulgaria Burgas
Excellent (9.2, Excellent reviews)
$98+
Primoretz Grand Hotel & Spa
Excellent (9, Excellent reviews)
$128+
Milano Hotel
Excellent (8.5, Excellent reviews)
$63+
Avenue Hotel
Good (7.8, Good reviews)
$52+
Aqua Hotel Burgas
Good (7.4, Good reviews)
$65+
See all hotels

How to Get Around Burgas

Public Transportation

Trolleys and buses run all over Burgas and charge лв1 per journey.

Taxi

Taxis are a very cheap way to get around Burgas (compared to other cities), charging around лв1.50 per mile.

Car

Car rental companies in town include Hertz, Bravo, and Burgas Car Rental, and rates start at about лв13 per day.

The Cost of Living in Burgas

Shopping Streets

The pedestrianized zone in the center is full of stores, but Burgas Plaza in the northern part of town has the biggest concentration of international brands.

Groceries and Other

Local grocery stores include Bolero, Lidl, and Billa, where you can expect to pay approximately лв7 for a gallon of milk.

Cheap meal
$8.75
A pair of jeans
$82.28
Single public transport ticket
$0.88
Cappuccino
$1.89
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